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Lindsey is Reform and Ashkenazi and lives in New York, which probably makes her the most likely ever to make this sort of a blog. She does comics and is best, Jewwise, at 20th century history and Israeli snack food.

Hannah was brought up Secular Humanist, which means she has no idea how to do any manner of religious ceremony and thinks that Sukkot involves Froot Loops, but is quite talented in the arts of building graham cracker shtetls and other extremely important cultural things. She also has a nearly encyclopedic knowledge of the history of antisemitism in medieval Europe, for some reason.

Oliver does not have any of this really cool encyclopedic knowledge but is sufficiently rad enough to make up for it simply by existing. She is a Reform Mizrahi from Rhode Island currently living in New Mexico, went to a Jewish summer camp for eight years, and greatly enjoys gluten free-ifying all of her favorite foods.

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12 September 14

also no, imperial japan proposed the large-scale settlement of jewish refugees in japanese-occupied china 

Posted: 6:02 AM
bunmer:

redhester:

bunmer:


A young Jewish refugee with her Chinese playmates. Shanghai, China (x)

Between 1933 and 1941, it is estimated that 20,000 Jews escaped persecution by fleeing to the Chinese port of Shanghai. Shanghai was one of the few places in the world that would accept Jewish refugees at this time, Japan being another.

i am furious that i am just now learning about this important fact.

Because it has nothing to do with the USA being the superhero and saving all the Jews

actually shanghai had been accepting jewish refugees for even longer than that!! many russian jewish families fled to shanghai following pogroms and government persecution after the russian revolution. my great-grandmother grew up there in the 1920s. a large jewish population stayed on after the war but were forced to leave along with all other immigrant communities during the cultural revolution. recently people in shanghai have taken steps to promote this chapter of their history, but for a long time the chinese government more or less swept it under the rug along with most anything else to do with immigrant populations in china. 

bunmer:

redhester:

bunmer:

A young Jewish refugee with her Chinese playmates. Shanghai, China (x)

Between 1933 and 1941, it is estimated that 20,000 Jews escaped persecution by fleeing to the Chinese port of Shanghai. Shanghai was one of the few places in the world that would accept Jewish refugees at this time, Japan being another.

i am furious that i am just now learning about this important fact.

Because it has nothing to do with the USA being the superhero and saving all the Jews

actually shanghai had been accepting jewish refugees for even longer than that!! many russian jewish families fled to shanghai following pogroms and government persecution after the russian revolution. my great-grandmother grew up there in the 1920s. a large jewish population stayed on after the war but were forced to leave along with all other immigrant communities during the cultural revolution. recently people in shanghai have taken steps to promote this chapter of their history, but for a long time the chinese government more or less swept it under the rug along with most anything else to do with immigrant populations in china. 

Reblogged: butterplops

Tags: china shanghai
9 September 14

artsnotwork:

my first commission, the aleph tree is finally done! installation is tomorrow.

a shulchan, a torah reading table for a synagogue in maryland. 42” high, 40” across 30” deep.

I can have my life back

Reblogged: xoxogossipirl

Posted: 12:03 AM

Manuscript title: Passover Haggadah

Manuscript summary: This Hebrew manuscript from the 15th century combines liturgical texts and commentaries on the rites that provide the temporal foundation for the observation of Passover. The Passah-Haggadah, adorned with miniatures and rich illustrations, contains the complete liturgical version of the Exodus story. The first part of the manuscript contains the text of the Italian rite, the second part that of the Ashkenazi. This manuscript was written and illuminated by Joël ben Siméon, who signed his work with a Kolophon (f. 34r): I am Joel ben Simeon, called Veibusch Ashkenazi – blessed be his memory – and I am from Cologne, which is on the banks of the Rhine.

Origin: Cologne (Germany)

Period: 15th century

Image source: Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 81: Passover Haggadah

(Source: Flickr / e-codices)

Reblogged: arthearst

Tags: passover
8 September 14

Reblogged: marxistswithattitude

Posted: 8:20 PM

kosherqueer:

60% of what is referred to as “anti-religious” hate crimes in the US target jews specifically, but like, “anti-religious” is an inaccurate label for something that applies to jews as an ethnic and cultural group as well as a religious community. islamophobia and antisemitism are not attacks on ideology, they are strains of racism and they are motivated by racism.

Reblogged: catrectangle

5 September 14

Reblogged: marxistswithattitude

3 September 14

Reblogged: marxistswithattitude

28 August 14

ladyyatexel:

Not Disney today, but I think you’ll forgive me, because this woman is amazing.  This is tagged under foreign disney since it’s in the same spirit as the Disney songs I post, but of course this movie was not made by Disney.

Ofra Haza performed the part of Moses’ mother in the song ‘Deliver Us' in 17 languages for the release of 'Prince of Egypt’, because she is a flawless badass.  Because it’s her native tongue, and the language the song would have performed in where these people actually singing, I am particularly enchanted with the Hebrew version (Hoshia na)

There was never a soundtrack release, so this is audio ripped from the movie, but it doesn’t diminish Ofra Haza being fucking amazing. This is intense and beautiful and you should listen to it.   What gets me the most, honestly is her single super powerful ‘Hoshia na’ near the end. 

Reblogged: quozzel

26 August 14

folksbiene:

"These Israeli and Palestinian Kids Would Rather Sing Than Fight: The YMCA Jerusalem Youth Chorus offers high schoolers sanity in a world gone mad."

They come to the Jerusalem Youth Chorus from as far away as Ramallah (a Palestinian outlook in the occupied West Bank) and a moshav (a Jewish settlement) outside of Jerusalem. They speak Arabic, Hebrew, and often a bit of English. They are five tenors, eight sopranos, six altos, and seven basses. They are 13 Palestinians and 13 Israelis, all high school students. Some are friends of friends with Gilad Shaar, Naftali Frenkel, and Eyal Yifrach, the Israeli teens whose kidnapping and killing sparked the latest round of clashes; others grew up around the corner from Muhammad Khdeir, a 16-year-old Palestinian boy who was murdered in the wake of those kidnappings.

For the past two years, the chorus—the only mixed Israeli-Palestinian choral group in the Holy City—has met weekly in Jerusalem to sing at the international YMCA, one of the few places Arabs and Jews can meet comfortably. This summer, they’ve rehearsed several times a week—despite the rocket launches and airstrikes—in a flurry of preparations for their first international singing tour. It took them last week to Kyoto and Tokyo, where they could enjoy a break from the troubles at home.

Read the full article here.

In the video above, the kids perform “Adinu,” based on a poem by the Sufi mystic Ibn ‘Arahi: “I believe in the religion of love, wherever love is found.”

Reblogged: marxistswithattitude

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh